Obituaries – 1920s

BENSON, Jane – Death of Centenarian – Dear Sir – I wish to record the death of Jane Benson, which tool place at the home of her daughter Mrs. W. H. Seward on August 28th [1922]. Deceased was the widow of David Benson of Hillview, T. B., and had reached the great age of one hundred and two years (102). In spite of her great age she retained most of her faculties to the last and was able to sit up in her room just a day or two previous to her passing. In her activity she presided over a large household at Hillview, and her was always afforded a warm to all who came that way. For the past 29 years she resided with her daughter, who with loving care ministered to her wants to the last. Her body was laid to rest in the C. of E. cemetery at Hearts Ease, the service being conducted by the Rev. R. Fowlow.  All classes united to pay their last tribute to one who had enjoyed their love and respect for so many years. She left to mourn one daughter and several grandchildren and great grandchildren. That her soul may rest in peace is the prayer of A -FRIEND. Gooseberry Cove, Random, T.B., Sept. Ist, 1922. (The Evening Telegram, September 12, 1922)

BENSON, Jane – Was 102 years when death called her – (To the Editor) – Dear Sir – I wish to record the death of Jane Benson, which took place at the home of her daughter, Mrs. W.H. Seward, on August 28th [1922]. Deceased was the widow of David Benson of Hillview, T. B., and had reached the great age of one hundred and two years (102). In spite of her great age she retained most of her faculties, and was able to sit up in her room just a day or two previous to her passing. In her activity she presided over a large household at Hillview, and her home always afforded a warm to any who came that way. For the past 29 years she resided with her daughter, who with loving care ministered to her wants to the last. Her body was laid to rest in the C. of E. Cemetery at Hearts Ease, the service being conducted by the Rev. R. Fowlow.  All clases united to pay their last tribute to one who had enjoyed their love and respect for so many years. She left to mourn one daughter, and many grandchildren and great grandchildren. That her soul may find rest and peace for her soul is the prayer of A -FRIEND. Gooseberry Cove, Sept. Ist, 1922. (Evening Advocate, September 13, 1922, page 5)

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CHURCHILL, Alice Mira – On Monday, Aug. 11th [1924], death visited the home of Mr. Albert Churchill of Hodge’s Cove, Random South, taking away his only child, Alice Mira, at the early age of 20 years, 7 months. The deceased was only eleven months old when her mother died, and as soon as she became old enough, took up the duties of housekeeping for her father, which duties she faithfully performed until a short time before her death. Even during her illness which lasted but a year, she struggled to care for her father, who she loved very much. The many wreaths that covered her casket, and the many young people who lingered weeping by her grave side showed how much Alice Mira Churchill was loved by the people of her home village. Our sympathy goes out to the lonely father, who without wife or child continues his journey alone. His beloved daughter found a friend in Jesus, who bore her safety thither, and she expressed a wish that her father too would seek and find this Friend, so that in his lonely hours he may find comfort, and meet his beloved ones in the end. (The Evening Telegram, August 22, 1924)

At Hodge’s Cove, Random South, on Aug. 11th, Alice Mira, only daughter of Albert Churchill, aged 20. (Newfoundland Weekly, September 9, 1924, page 4)

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 ET 1923 04 21 CHURCHILL, Susanna E (nee Ash) – Mr. Edward Ash, received a message on Monday [April 16, 1923] from Hodge’s Cove, T. B., conveying the sad intelligence that his daughter, Mrs. Caleb Churchill (nee Miss Susie Ash), had passed away there in the forenoon. Deceased had been in delicate health the past winter, but hopes were entertained for her recovery. Mrs. Churchill had many friends here who will learn with regret that she had been called away from earthly scenes at the early age of thirty-seven [37] years. We sympathize with Mr. Ash on the occasion of the passing of his only child, and with her husband and friends. She will be laid to rest at Hodge’s Cove, T. B., ’till that glad Easter morn “When , father, sister, child and mother meet once more.” (The Evening Telegram, April 21, 1923)

 

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DODGE, Mary (nee Short) – Dear Sir,- Please allow me space in your paper the Evening Advocate to record the death of our dear mother, Mary Dodge, who died at Island Cove, Jan.20th, at the age of 87 years.  We wish to thank Mr. George Vey, Mr. Stephen Barfit, Mr. John Barfit,
Mr. John Stringer, Mr. W. H. Seward, who kindly came with their horses and took the remains of our late mother and relatives to Gooseberry Cove on Wednesday morning, after the storm of Tuesday. Also Mrs.  Elizt. Jane Smith, Mrs. Pheobe Smith, and all kind friends of Gooseberry Cove who in any way assisted them.
Mrs. Emma A. Smith
Mrs. Bertha Smith     (Reprinted from the Evening Advocate, 1924-02-29)

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FLYNN, William Well Known Business Man of Heart’s Ease Passes Away – Mr. William Flynn, one of the most widely known merchants of Trinity Bay, passed peacefully away a few weeks ago at his home in Heart’s Ease. Mr. Flynn had been ill for several months and despite the best medical attention and all that a loving wife and family could do, the end came, but not before he had received the last rites of Holy Church. Mr. Flynn was a very prominent figure in his neighborhood and a good kind man to all in want. He will be greatly missed by many people of that section, to whom he was ever a faithful friend and general advisor. Mr. Flynn was born at King’s Cove and moved to Heart’s Ease many years ago, where he conducted a prosperous business ever since. Left to mourn are his wife and several children, to whom The Family Fireside extends very sincere sympathy. (Reprinted from Family Fireside 1926, MUN Digital Collection)

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DRODGE, John – Passed peacefully away, at 5 a.m., yesterday, John, the beloved husband of Mary Ann Drodge, age 66 years. Left to mourn the loss of a loving husband and kind father are a wife, 3 daughters, 2 sons, 2 sisters, 20 grandchildren, and a large circle of friends. Funeral takes place on Thursday, at 2:30 p.m. from his late residence, Lower Battery Road.  (reprinted from Evening Telegram, February 15, 1923)

Fell asleep in Jesus.
Dearest father thou hast left us,
On this earth no more to see;
And some day in heaven we’ll meet you,
Where we’ll never part from thee.                                  

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NEWMAN GOOBY, (Queen’s Cove, T.B.) – “I have fought a good fight, I have finished my course, I have kept the Faith.” – 1st Timothy, 4 chap., 9 verse. After 81 years of faithful service there passed away on Christmas Eve, after a short illness, one of Trinity Bays oldest and most respected men in the person of Newman Gooby, who for 40 years has been connected with the Methodist Church as Lay-Reader, and also Sunday School Superintendent for a number of years. The deceased was born at Old Perlican in 1844 where he resided in his boyhood days, after which he went to Queen’s Cove where he resided until his death. His wife, Elizabeth Cramm, of Old Perlican predeceased him 26 years ago. Funeral took place on Sunday, Dec. 27th, which was largely attended by people from all the nearby places. Leaving to mourn are 4 daughters, Mrs. Adam Benson, Clay-Pits, T.B.; Mrs. Edmund Whalen, Queen’s Cove, T.B. with whom he lived at the time of his death. Mrs. Archibald Drover and Mrs. Josiah Drodge, both of this city. Also 1 sister, Mrs. Eli Martin, Heart’s Ease, T.B., and 1 brother, Mr. Simon Gooby Sr., of this city. Besides several grand-children and a wide circle of relatives and friends, his many friends will be sorry to hear of his passing.
Asleep in Jesus blessed sleep,
From which none other wakes to weep,
A calm and understurbed repose,
Unbroken by the last of foes.
(Evening Telegram, January 7, 1923)

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HISCOCK, George – Sealer Died Suddenly
 Evening Telegram 19 Mar 1923Sealer Died Suddenly.CAUSE DUE TO HEART FAILURE.Capt. Wm. Bartlett of the S.S. Viking apprised Messrs. Bowring Bros. by wireless on Friday night that one of the crew, named George Hiscock, of Hodge’s Cove, T. B., had died suddenly of heart failure on board the ship. As soon as the sad intelligence had been received the relatives of the deceased were at once acquainted. A later message stated that the body will be kept in ice and will be-brought back by the steamer for burial. Deceased was in his 40th year, and is survived by a wife and family.

 

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NORRIS, William – The fourteen-year-old son of Mr. W. H. NORRIS was drowned on St. Stephens’ Day while skating on a pond near Little Heart’s Ease. The accident was witnessed by his mother, who immediately rushed to the rescue. She was barely prevented from drowning by the efforts of an aged man. The mother collapsed on the spot.  (Transcribed by Maxine Edwards from Bay Roberts Guardian, January 11, 1924)

Note: The fourteen year old boy was William Norris and he was the son of William Henry Norris and Mary Jemima Penney. He was playing on the newly formed ice on a local pond known as “The Gully.” This gully no longer exist because it was drained with the construction of road in Little Harbour. The Gully was between present-day  Salvation Army Church and Dallas Marsh on the left-hand side of the road as one drives down the arm. According to Edith Norris, wife of Ernest Norris, William fell through the ice and his skate became entangled in some roots of the trees below the surface of the water. He could not free himself. Attempts at recovering the body were initial unsuccessful, until Isaac Benson brought a dory from Little Harbour to the Gully. The men were successful in retrieving the body. (by Lester Green)

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POND, Nathan – Death of Former Resident of Badger’s Quay in New York

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Under the lowering sky of a winter’s eve, interspersed here and there with bright spots, all that was mortal of Nathan Pond was laid at rest to-day in Mount Olive Cemetery amid American elips and oaks on the slope of a hill overlooking the placid waters of Long Island Sound, in the Borough of Queen’s, City of New York.
Born in Badger’s Quay, Bonavista Bay, Nfld., the son of John and Sarah Pond. By temperament and disposition the deceased possessed some of the sturdiness not Infrequently displayed by the Vikings of the northern flow. At the outbreak of the world war he enlisted In the “Nfld. Royal Navel Reserve, where for four long years he served his Country and Empire in assisting to patrol the five oceans.
On returning to civilian life he married Mrs. Eldred Gosae, daughter of George and Elisa Butt of Queen’s Cove, Random Sound, Trinity Bay, whose first husband paid the supreme sacrifice when the R. M. Laurentic was torpedoed and sunk off the Irish Coast in January 1916.
Not contented with the mode of re habitation in Newfoundland, the deceased started out for pastures new and came to New York in the month of August, 1921, where he entered the trade as an iron worker. Thanks to his unbounded energy and perseverance he grasped the skirts of opportunlty to bring about the crowning achievement in his chosen line of endeavor, namely, foreman rigger.
Having been promoted only a few days before, and sensing to some extent his new and added rcsponsibilities, he ascended to the second floor of a two million dollar building to lay out work for them in his charge and in the act of descending, on Dec 15, 1926, he lost his balance and fell backwards. Darting his right leg through the rungs of the ladder he sled head down a distance of twenty feet, breaking his thigh bone and spinal cord. He was rushed to the nearest hospital where he lay unconscious for seventy-two hours. After regaining consciousness he was placed in a cast of plaster of Paris and received the best surgical and medicial treatment known to science, but all to no avail for on Jan. 14th, as easily as the eastern sky slips into its silver kimino of the morning, he foil into that long sleep from which there Is no earthly awakening.
The services at the home and at the tomb were conducted by the Rev. Dr. Edwards of Queen’s Baptist Church where the deceased used to attend. Following the service at the home the mourners and friends were taken in several motor cars which made up the procession. Through the winding path of Mount Olive Cemetery the coriege moved over a carpet of fallen leaves to the tomb. Being a member of Tasker Masonic Lodge at St, John’s. Nfld, a delegation of Queen’s Masonic Lodge deposited sprigs of acacia on the lowered casket, tokens of fraternal farewell. During this part of the ceremony the setting sun drove through the hase and splashed the whole gathering with its shafts of golden light, as though it also would lay its life-giving hand in commendation on the humble and faithfull husband at rest.
Besides his father and mother and five brothers and three sisters now residing at Badge’s Quay, the deceased leaves to mourn a wife and four sons, whose ages are 9 months, 2, 3 1/2, and 6 years respectively. Thus ends the career of a man who would have made a name worthy of the best traditions of the land that gave him his birth.
Alan G. Benson
931-80th St. Brooklyn, NY City
Jan. 16, 1926

(Reprinted from the Evening Telegram February 3, 1926)

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Death of Hannah Seward_Evening Telegram_July 15, 1922 SEWARD, Hannah –  There passed away at Southport, on July 1st, [1922], after a short illness, an old and respected resident in the person of Hannah Seward, aged 85 years, beloved wife of Richard Seward, who is left to mourn; also one son Edward at home, two daughters, Mrs. William Flynn, of Heart’s Ease, T. B., and Mrs. James Yetman, of Port au Port; 16 grandchildren and 6 great grandchildren. May her soul rest in peace. (Evening Telegram, July 15, 1922)

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SEWARD, Moses – A message was received by the Minister of Marine and Fisheries Thursday from Mr. William Flynn of Gooseberry Cove, T. Bay, telling of a sad drowning accident which occurred at that place when Moses Seward and his grandson lost their lives. No particulars of the tragedy have been received. (Reprinted from the Western Star, April 24, 1926)

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SMITH, Stephen – It is with deepest regret we record the death of our dear father which occurred at his home at Hodge’s Cove on Feb 27 [1925] at the age of 84 years. He was of a kind and gentle disposition and during his lifetime made many staunch friends, by whom he was beloved unto death, and to whom his help was ever ready to be extended when required. Stephen Smith was born at Bishop’s Cove. C.B.. in 1840, and took up his residence at Random fifty-four years ago. For some months past he had been ailing, but as his time approached he was resigned to the parting. His passing was peaceful and there can be little doubt but that he is now enjoying the rest which his God has promised those who labour in his name. He was laid to rest in the Church of England cemetery at Hodge’s Cove, there to wait the Resurrection of the just. Left to mourn are two sons, William and Isaac, three daughters, Rosamund, Rhoda, and Annie, 38 grand children and 8 great grand children, besides a large circle of friends. He will be sadly missed by all. 

He has passed through path, and suffering
Till he sank in death to rest
Left this earth to be with Jesus
In the mansions of the Blest
 
Bright Is his glory now
Boundless his joy above
Where on the bosom of hls God
He rests in perfect love.
 
Asleep in Jesus Blessed sleep
From which none e’er wakes to weep
A calm and undisturbed repose
Unbroken by the last of foes
 
—Inserted by his Daughter, Queen’s Cove.  (Reprinted from Daily Globe, March 13, 1925)

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Vardy, Emily (nee Stanley) — At Clarenville, on April 12th, Emily Vardy, aged 34 years and. 8 months, beloved wife of George Vardy leaving a husband and 6 children, father, mother, 4 brothers, 1 sister and a large circle of friends to mourn their sad loss. Gone but not forgotten. (Reprinted from St. John’s Daily Star, 1920-04-19)

 

 

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Transcribed by Wanda Garrett, Lisa Garrett and Brandon Seward. Page created April 2015. Last updated September 2021

These transcriptions may contain human errors. As always, confirm these as you would any other source material.